Self Care Retreat: Principles for smart living

On Sunday, March 27th through the 31st I have the privilege of leading a very special retreat with Louise Hay, a beloved teacher and writer who has touched the lives of millions of people around the world.  This retreat will be held at Miraval Resort and Spa and is based, in part, on a book that Louise and I have been working on for the last few months called, You Can Trust Your Life. “This retreat is a combination of deep inner work, deep relaxation, and joyous fun,” Louise explained, as we planned the program. “Everybody leaves five years younger.”  Sounds good to me!

It’s been an extraordinary experience to spend time with an elder who has had such a profound influence on the self-help movement.  Louise is a woman who walks her talk and each conversation with her is a gift.  This week, I’d like to share a bit of her wisdom with you…

Keep it simple. I can’t tell you the number of times Louise has said, “I like to keep things simple.  Simple is good.”  Whether it’s creating an affirmation, making changes to how you eat, or adding a new, good-feeling habit to your day, Louise knows from years of experience that it’s small, simple steps taken over time, that lead to big, long lasting change. When in doubt, choose simplicity as your guiding principle.

Stop giving your precious energy to things that make you feel bad.  Isn’t it amazing how often we find ourselves ruminating about what isn’t working in life?  You might be obsessing about a painful exchange you had with someone, an upsetting email, or a task that needs to be done – one you’d rather avoid.  Rarely does Louise give much energy to anything negative.  She shifts her attention very quickly and focuses on how to bring good to a situation.  Remember, you’re an energy transmitter and receiver.  Be sure you’re sending out the kind of signal you’d like to get back.

When faced with a problem, challenge or crisis, use your mind to fix it first.  The very first thing to do when dealing with a difficult situation is to create an affirmation that reflects what you most want to have happen.  Then, repeat it several times throughout the day.  Say it to yourself while in the shower, while driving in the car, or every time you think about the issue.  Use your tendency to focus on what isn’t working as a trigger.  The moment you catch yourself feeling bad or thinking about a problem, choose thoughts that move you in a better direction.  Pretty soon you’ll find yourself doing it automatically and, as a result, life will get better.

Fill your mind with goodness and good will prevail.  In keeping with this theme, I wanted to give you an update on our “good-stuff” giveaway plan.  We’ve created a private, online sign up form for you to fill out so you can become eligible to receive a gift.  Please be assured that this information will only be used for this purpose:  to spread a little joy around the world.  Every now and then I’ll choose someone at random from the list and send a surprise.  You can sign up here.

Have a happy week!

Take Action Challenge

Simple, simple, simple.  This week, implement one principle from above with a small step and notice how your experience during the day shifts.  Start with a little energy boost from this week’s video…

Patti sent this link with a note that read: “I believe this falls into the category of dance hard, badly, and often … and sing way too loud in the car!” You’ll find this week’s video here.  Thanks, Patti!

Hay House, Inc.

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Author Information

Cheryl Richardson

Cheryl Richardson is the author of The New York Times bestselling books, Take Time for Your Life, Life Makeovers, Stand Up for Your Life, The Unmistakable Touch of Grace and her new book The Art of Extreme Self Care. She was the first president of the International Coach Federation and holds one of their first Master Certified Coach credentials.

Books from Cheryl Richardson

Self Care Cards Cover image
Cheryl Richardson
 
You Can Create An Exceptional Life Cover image
Louise Hay, Cheryl Richardson
 
 

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