Can Your Mind Influence Your Genes?

Yes! It’s doing it 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It’s impossible, actually, to disentangle your mind from your genes.

When you learn something new, or think the same thing over and over again, the brain lays down neural pathways. But they don’t just spring out of thin air. They are the consequence of a series of events that result in the activation and deactivation of hundreds of genes. But here’s the thing – these events are set in motion by something you’re thinking about!

Setting aside the details for a moment, what we’re left with is that thinking leads to the activation and deactivation of genes. This is what I call the mind-gene interface.

We see the same thing with meditation. Consistent meditation has been shown to bring about structural changes in the brain. With meditation it is mental focus on something – an idea, perhaps, or breathing – that brings about theses effects. An 8-week meditation study at Harvard even showed that meditation impacted 1,561 genes in novice meditators and 2,219 genes in experienced meditators. In the novices, 874 genes were switched on and 687 were switched off.

Some people might wonder why this is important to know. It’s important because we grow up believing that the mind is impotent, something that we only use to think with and to analyse life events. But this is disempowering. It leads us to think that we can’t do anything to help ourselves or to change anything.

A good friend of mine spent some weeks in hospital over the past year. Being a proactive person with a determination to do what he could to facilitate his own recovery, when he asked what he could do to help himself, he was told, ‘nothing’.

But this response is only a habit of thinking that’s based on the notion that the mind is impotent, and I’d probably have given the same response myself if I was wedded to that notion. Actually, the mind can be thought of as a force, in that the mind’s focus can bring about biological and physiological effects in the brain and body. Knowing this, there is never nothing that a person can do. We have to think, so how about we learn what to think about?

On a totally obvious level, for instance, if a person is sick, thinking about stressful things is not going to help. Chemicals of stress can be produced and circulate around the body. So thinking about calming things can help. Similarly, thinking affectionately is good for the heart. Thinking hostile and aggressive thoughts isn’t.

We’re all chemists in a way. The chemistry of the brain and body responds to what we focus on and how we feel. If we learn what to focus on we can, to an extent, switch on and off different chemistry. We then take our chemistry skills onto a new level. I see this as the next great development in mind-body medicine.

I believe we have a much greater ability to affect our health than we think. We just need to get over the notion that the mind has no effect on the body. If anyone ever tries to tell you that the mind has no effect on the body, ask them if they’ve ever had a sexual fantasy. The reason I explain the science of mind-body medicine is to give people faith in themselves. I believe that this faith can make a real difference.

Believing in a medicine or in a doctor leads to better outcomes than not believing, so clearly belief has effects. So how about we learn to believe in ourselves? Not at the expense of medical advice, of course, but in addition to it.

Your mind is more powerful than you think. And you are the one who directs it. How about we learn to focus on things we’re grateful for? How about we learn to feel empathy and compassion more? How about we learn to cultivate thoughts of love and affection? You are a chemist and that would be some nice chemistry.

It’s a start. And at the very least we’re doing something positive with our minds.

 

Comments

RonDP 12th July 2013 7:11 am

David,

My mind filter loves your ideas.

Thanks for the strength,

This morning I'll breathe in more magical thoughts of "Blessings for All"

As I workout at the gym.

Go Genes,

Ron

Tiff 14th July 2013 8:18 pm

Thank you for this wonderful reminder.

Mythias 16th July 2013 3:08 am

35 000 genes within the human dna structure, 250 of which are dormant, science cant explain why they are there, yet science still has a lot to catch up on. Our original dna structure contained 12 strands as opposed to the 2 we have today in the double helix. In the last few years there have been children born with the 3rd strand in place...ie the triple helix. Now I would like to know how this affects the 2 genetic structures we find today, namely those that can be traced to the rhesus monkey and those that cannot. From my current understanding it seems that this is also related to blood groups ie 15% of the worlds population are within the negative blood groups and the other 85% are in the positive blood groups. those with negative blood types cannot be traced back to the monkey. This indicates that our genes were tampered with in the recent past( a story way to complicated to go into here). So is it correct to assume that were are about to evolve in 2 seperate directions?

Advertisement

Keep updated with Spirit Library

Author Information

David R. Hamilton PhD

David R. Hamilton PhD is the bestselling author of 6 books that fuse science, the mind, and spiritual wisdom.

Books from David R. Hamilton PhD

Why Kindness is Good for You Cover image
David R. Hamilton PhD
 
How Your Mind Can Heal Your Body Cover image
David R. Hamilton PhD
 
 

Advertisement

David R. Hamilton PhD Archives