Messages & Channelings

We all know how enjoyable it is to have happy times with friends and family. These times are also good for our health. Here’s 5 reasons why.

David R. Hamilton PhD > My Experience With a Homeless Man

I met a homeless man in London one Sunday morning a few months ago. Our brief exchange has had a lasting effect upon me.

Most people believe that the secret to living to a very old age is simply down to the food we eat or how much exercise we take, or even whether we drink or smoke or how much stress there is in our lives. This is because most longevity research (research into lifespan) has focused upon these factors. And they all do play an important role in lifespan. But one vital ingredient is missing from this menu. That ingredient is friends.

We often doubt ourselves and imagine that we have to change so that the world accepts us. We imagine we need to compromise on our dreams, on doing what makes our hearts sing, in order to succeed.

In other blogs, I’ve written how kindness is the opposite of stress in terms of its physiological effects. At first, one might imagine that peace is the opposite of stress, but peace is more the absence of stress than its opposite.

A simple awareness of the power of self-correction generates a feeling of hope. And that hope shifts the centre of gravity away from seeking solutions in other places, and into yourself.

When we think of side effects the first thing that springs to mind are the side effects of drugs. But who’d have thought that kindness could have side effects too? Well, it does! And positive ones at that.

Any mother intuitively knows that her children need love. Now, a wealth of scientific evidence is shining light on why this is so. The Budapest Early Intervention Project (BEIP), a project that examined the health and development of children in Romanian orphanages, found startling evidence that when infants and children are starved of love and affection, their bodies do not grow as they should.

David R. Hamilton PhD > The 3 Paths of Intuition

I think I’ve been really quite intuitive lately – from making the right choices to even guessing (to the second) when the oven timer was going to beep – so I decided to share what I knew about intuition, how it works, even why we have it. There seems to be different types of intuition, or at least 3 different mechanisms regarding how it works. Here’s the 3 that I’m aware of

David R. Hamilton PhD > Think Yourself Positive

The brain’s circuits are not fixed. Our experiences constantly change the wiring in our brains, a phenomenon known as neuroplasticity. The more we do something, the more the brain physically changes as it wires it in. A study of London taxi drivers showed neuroplasticity. It found that the hippocampus of the brain, which is involved in learning new routes as well as with spatial awareness, grew larger the more time they spent driving their taxis.

 

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