Celebrating Father's Day

It’s Father’s Day in the U.S. as I write this, a day when we celebrate our relationship with our fathers. Some of us don’t have a lot to celebrate, our fathers may have been absent, unknown, or so emotionally distant that we cannot find a reason to celebrate our relationship with them. My father has been dead for 25 years and while I spent much of my life being angry with him and wondering whether he cared about me at all, I now understand so much more of him and can actually be grateful for the gifts he gave me instead of focusing on how he ignored so many opportunities to show how much he loved and cared about me. (the photo is of my father and me, taken quite a few years ago!)

Fathers mirror our lessons in power and love, often through their limitations instead of their abilities. My father was, as were many of the men of his generation, emotionally damaged. Orphaned during WWII at age 4 and adopted at age 7, much of his life was lived with the question of what happened to his family and why he wasn’t worthy of being with them. He was quiet, withdrawn, and emotionally disconnected. Yet, there were a few times, like the first time I was rejected by a boy I liked, that he was loving and supportive. I wanted him to be strong and powerful, to protect me and to show me that he loved me so I could know that I was lovable. But he didn’t love himself or feel worthy of love, based on his life experiences, so he could not give that kind of love to me.

I know that now and am at peace with it but it took me a very long time to figure it out. I had many expectations of my father and was very angry because he did not meet them. I could not appreciate his pain because I wanted him to fix mine, to show me that I was powerful and worthy of love. He lived with me during the last few months of his life and that gave me an opportunity to see the depth of his emotional suffering, the feelings of unworthiness, the deep hurt at having been separated from his family, and how closed his heart was. In the moments before he died he told me he loved me, that he was proud of me and apologized for not being a better father. It had taken him over 30 years to say that to me and it was the healing and proof of love that I needed.

It was also a choice point for me and I could accept it and move on or be angry and reject this gift because it was too little, too late. I chose to accept it, grateful that he loved me enough to find the courage to say it, even if it was in the last moments of his life. I now know, with the understanding that comes from experience, wisdom that comes with age, and compassion from being a parent, that my father’s emotional limitations were his gift to me. We choose our parents, even our distant, hurtful, absent, or wounded fathers, so that we can heal ourselves. The belief that fathers should be or should have been ____________ (fill in the blank) puts the burden of our healing on them and limits our ability to learn and heal from our shared journey.

Whether they were horribly abusive or lovingly kind, there was a reason we chose them and when we can be compassionate and forgiving with them and ourselves, we can release lifetimes of anger and disappointment and accept them for who they are, human beings doing the best they can with what they were taught and know. Whether you were well or poorly fathered, your father is part of your soul group, an important aspect of your healing journey and another mirror of your healing.

There is another aspect to consider as we decide whether we are going to spend our lives resenting our fathers for their poor parenting skills or move beyond those emotions and view them with compassionate kindness and understanding, and that is the awakening of the Divine Masculine energy. We celebrate the rise of the Divine Feminine, after eons of suppression, which was part of our Atlantis Legacy and which I write about in my book, The Atlantis Legacy, which you can purchase on Amazon at this link. The Divine Masculine energy represents the rejoining of the masculine to its heart center, which it has been disconnected from for as long as the Divine Feminine has been disconnected from its power.

Through countless centuries of war, death, domination, and control, the masculine energy has had its heart broken and it is time for it to be reconnected so men can be whole and complete once more, reunited with the unconditional love that is part of their divine blueprint. We see it in today’s younger generation of fathers who are caretakers and providers to their children in ways that my generation never was. By forgiving our fathers, we can open the portals for this reconnection to occur and bless future generations with parents who are equally loving, compassionate, supportive, and aware of their power in ways that allow them to express all of the love in their hearts to everyone in their life.

Comments

Tiff 18th June 2014 6:10 am

Thank You, Jennifer.

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Uriel Heals

Uriel Heals

The Archangel Uriel is here to help humanity through the Shift in Consciousness by interacting with us as we shift into higher dimensions of consciousness. Uriel, one of the seven Archangels that stand at the throne of the Creator, is known as the "Light of God" and governs the Mental Plane.

Books from Jennifer Hoffman

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